Nixie Pipe – Modern Day LED Nixie Tube

Nixie Pipe is my interpretation of a modern day Nixie Tube – the cold-cathode vacuum gas-filled tubes from the 1960s.

The project came about when I decided to make a clock for my kitchen, with specific requirement for an egg timer function! I’ve always wanted to make a Nixie Tube clock but having completed a Nixie Tube project recently and one pipe failing after around 6,000 hours, I wanted to come up this something better. Something that didn’t require high voltages, special driving circuitry, could be easily interfaced and was modular, but which maintained the unique visual depth of a Nixie Tube. Continue reading Nixie Pipe – Modern Day LED Nixie Tube

Chess Table

We needed a coffee table for our new house but had yet to find the right thing. I found this tired black circular table outside a neighbour’s house and was inspired to create a nice top for it.

Whitterm-220 Clever Serial Terminal

The Whitterm-220 (WT-220) is my latest project. It’s a clever terminal, in the sense that it aims to emulate the dumb terminals of the 80s but with the versatility of something produced now. The name comes from my inspiration for the project: failure to win a VT-220 on eBay. I decided it would be fun to make a homage to the VT-220, that would actually be useful – a not so dumb, or clever terminal – that would do more than simply parsing RS232 levels into Ascii characters.

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Nixie Tube Energy Meter

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Having recently bought a house, project time has been a bit thin on the ground. As a standard terrace house, the consumer unit and electricity meter were in the entrance hallway, exposed and looking a bit naff. I liked the look of the meter so I quickly created a box that allowed the meter to poke through and leave access to the fuses.

The box covering did the job but felt a bit cumbersome with all that spare space; it needed something else to give it more purpose. An energy meter was the obvious thing but I didn’t want a garish LCD or 7 segment display, it need to match the blown glass electricity meter… …nixie tubes!

The Nixie Module runs off 5V and SPI
The Nixie Module runs off 5V and SPI making the project quick to get off the ground

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Noise Crayon – Noise Amplitude to Light Spectrum Converter

Continuing on from my Ambient Noise Level Indicator, I wanted to create an enclosure and make it stand-alone – not requiring a computer to do the processing. I ended up with a little device that converts noise amplitude to the light spectrum: Noise Crayon.

The Ambient Noise Level Indicator used the MCU serial host Processing to perform a FFT and various averaging routines to create an indicator for ambient noise. The idea being that it would change colour when background levels rise above a threshold. Moving to an ATMEGA328, performing this processing – especially the FFT – is asking a little too much of it. There are libraries but I’ve heard of limited successes.

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Wooden Bits – Binary Clock

Wooden Bits Gif

I’ve been meaning to make a binary wall clock for a while and to also try out kerf bending with the laser cutter. What put me off creating kerf bends before I found OpenSCAD, was the manual creation of all the lines in the right places. It’s the kind of repetitive, uniform task computers were made to do.

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Laser Cut Adaptable Wire Dispenser in OpenSCAD

I wanted a wire dispenser that wasn’t fixed in place so I could move it to where I was working. To my surprise, such a thing doesn’t exist (I couldn’t seem to find fixed ones either, other than using a kitchen towel rail). Keen to put my new found love for OpenSCAD to use, I set about making such a thing.

The `projection()` command in *OpenSCAD* allows one to easily create 3d objects that can be exported as 2d .dxf for printing
The projection() command in *OpenSCAD* allows one to easily create 3d objects that can be exported as 2d .dxf for printing

OpenSCAD really suits this type of design requirement; something that is going to need to scale user defined variables (the wire reel in this case). I didn’t want to create a design for 6 wire reels from a specific manufacturer, then find they change their spindle, or I decide I need more reels. It’s particularly hard scaling a laser cut box because of all the teeth/dents that slot it together. With a GUI based CAD program, you’d send hours fiddling around with the spacings/length or trying to create patterns – then still ending up with bits that don’t fit together! This is actually my second project in OpenSCAD that I’d bashed together quickly. I’ve got another more complex project to document too.
Continue reading Laser Cut Adaptable Wire Dispenser in OpenSCAD