Nixie Pipe – Modern Day LED Nixie Tube

Nixie Pipe is my interpretation of a modern day Nixie Tube – the cold-cathode vacuum gas-filled tubes from the 1960s.

The project came about when I decided to make a clock for my kitchen, with specific requirement for an egg timer function! I’ve always wanted to make a Nixie Tube clock but having completed a Nixie Tube project recently and one pipe failing after around 6,000 hours, I wanted to come up this something better. Something that didn’t require high voltages, special driving circuitry, could be easily interfaced and was modular, but which maintained the unique visual depth of a Nixie Tube. Continue reading Nixie Pipe – Modern Day LED Nixie Tube

Noise Crayon – Noise Amplitude to Light Spectrum Converter

Continuing on from my Ambient Noise Level Indicator, I wanted to create an enclosure and make it stand-alone – not requiring a computer to do the processing. I ended up with a little device that converts noise amplitude to the light spectrum: Noise Crayon.

The Ambient Noise Level Indicator used the MCU serial host Processing to perform a FFT and various averaging routines to create an indicator for ambient noise. The idea being that it would change colour when background levels rise above a threshold. Moving to an ATMEGA328, performing this processing – especially the FFT – is asking a little too much of it. There are libraries but I’ve heard of limited successes.

Continue reading Noise Crayon – Noise Amplitude to Light Spectrum Converter

SoundBar VU Meter Laminated Wooden Speaker

I felt that the battery powered Bluetooth speaker I made could be improved with more colour! Taking a leaf from the VU meters on amplifiers of the 80s, I decided it would be neat to sandwich clear acrylic between the plywood layers, each with an integrated LED that would form a full body amplitude meter.

Having a look around, I found a IC made by Texas instruments that did the VU meter job for me: the LM3915. Below is a photo series showing the construction and completed unit. I designed this version as a soundbar to sit below my monitors at work, so it doesn’t have a battery or Bluetooth, making the wiring easier inside and a slimmer unit. For this one I also used an Oak stain rather than a clear stain on the ply and filled the text with black acrylic, which looks much better I think.

Garmin Stem Mount

Having seen the Bar Fly I became set on a ‘SRM style’ mounting for my Garmin. I wasn’t set to pay £40 for one however.

Doing my research, it turned out the Bar Fly was inspired by a thread on a bike forum (a Triathlon forum none the less), where many had come up with a number of different mounting methods. I decided I could come up with my own variation using a £2 piece of acrylic from eBay and a dremel.

My first attempt is fairly crude compared to some fine examples of home design and build but it does the job for an hour’s work. If I can get my hands on a 3d printer I have some other designs in mind…