Raspberry Pi DAC – MCP4725 with wiringPi

The Raspberry Pi lacks a DAC but using the I2C bus, one can easily add a device like the 12bit MCP4725. The GPIO library wiringPi provides support for I2C devices, however, getting the MCP4725 working with it isn’t a simple as one might hope. The device is 12bit but the I2C protocol works on bytes (8bits). To send 12bit data, the Microchip designed the message transfer like this:

The MC4725 expects the 12bit data to be broken into two bytes and sent directly after each other.
The MC4725 expects the 12bit data to be broken into two bytes and sent directly after each other.

Continue reading Raspberry Pi DAC – MCP4725 with wiringPi

Noise Crayon – Noise Amplitude to Light Spectrum Converter

Continuing on from my Ambient Noise Level Indicator, I wanted to create an enclosure and make it stand-alone – not requiring a computer to do the processing. I ended up with a little device that converts noise amplitude to the light spectrum: Noise Crayon.

The Ambient Noise Level Indicator used the MCU serial host Processing to perform a FFT and various averaging routines to create an indicator for ambient noise. The idea being that it would change colour when background levels rise above a threshold. Moving to an ATMEGA328, performing this processing – especially the FFT – is asking a little too much of it. There are libraries but I’ve heard of limited successes.

Continue reading Noise Crayon – Noise Amplitude to Light Spectrum Converter

Developing Simulink Device Drivers for ARM Cortex

Simulink Embedded Coder offers an ARM Cortex-M support toolbox, which includes code optimisation for the MCU and QEMU emulation but lacks any S-Block drivers for the device. The lack of drivers limits the Simulink development to merely number crunching. You can create cevel blocks that execute external C functions but this requires separate source files with a shared header and pre-defined initialisation, leaving the model without full control of the hardware. In this post, I go over the process of creating hardware driver S-Blocks.

Continue reading Developing Simulink Device Drivers for ARM Cortex

Wooden Bits – Binary Clock

Wooden Bits Gif

I’ve been meaning to make a binary wall clock for a while and to also try out kerf bending with the laser cutter. What put me off creating kerf bends before I found OpenSCAD, was the manual creation of all the lines in the right places. It’s the kind of repetitive, uniform task computers were made to do.

Continue reading Wooden Bits – Binary Clock